Farewell to the Captain

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New York Yankees’ Shortstop and Captain, Derek Jeter, sent shockwaves through the sports world when he announced on Face book that the 2014 season would be his last.

Jeter fractured his left ankle in the 2012 ALCS and experienced some setbacks during his recovery that pushed his return back until after the 2013 All-Star break, when he initially wanted to be back starting on Opening Day. He would have three more stints on the disabled list due to ankle, calf, and quadriceps injuries that would limit him to only 17 games played. This started a lot of talk about Jeter’s age and durability from there on out.

Jeter states in his lengthily post “The one thing I always said to myself was that when baseball started to feel more like a job, it would be time to forward.” He also held a press conference on February 19th and stated that when he was going to Yankee Stadium every day, but not putting on a uniform, it made him start thinking how much longer he wanted to keep doing this. Jeter also stated that his health did not factor into his decision and that physically he “feels great.” Some of the reasons he mentioned in his message for retiring included wanting to do many things in business and philanthropy and possibly starting a family of his own.

The announcement caught the media and players off guard; many thinking he could play up to his mid-40s. Many of the reactions also included praise for how Jeter conducted himself on and off the field. He was notoriously private with his personal life and was able to keep a very clean image in what can be an overwhelming market for some others.

Derek Jeter’s career was nothing short of spectacular and had more than its fair share of spectacular moments, including “The Flip” against Oakland in the 2001 ALDS, his face-first dive into the stands against the Red Sox in 2004, and his 3,000th hit being a home run in 2011. Some of his career accomplishments include winning five World Series championships (1996, 1998-2000, 2009), the 1996 AL Rookie of the Year award, being a 5-time Silver Slugger and Gold Glove Award winner, and 13-time All-Star.

Although there’s a lot of disappointment that this will be the last season seeing No.2,  Derek Jeter has reminded everyone that 2014 is still yet to be played and he wants the fans and everyone around him to savor every moment of it like he will.

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