Addiction to the Cell Phone

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Are you a cell phone addict?  Cell phone addiction is a bad habit that is growing day by day.  According to cellphoneaddiction.org, more and more college students are using their cell phones throughout the entire day, which keeps them from doing other activities such as spending time with their family and friends, exercising or anything else for that matter.

 

The extent of the problem is suggested in a new national survey discussed by Channel 13 WYNT.  The study done among Skidmore College students, found the following:

  • 88 percent of college students have texted during class
  • 25 percent say they text every class
  • Twenty three percent of those surveyed say they text during a few classes every day
  • 18 percent of Skidmore College students text during class a few times per week
  • 60 percent of college students are addicted to their phones.  Students who are waiting to hear back from someone can’t resist answering their phone.

 

While cell phone addictions are bad on their own, the habit can be much more serious if those who text dare extend their addiction to vehicles.  Many states have banned texting while driving and some states have banned cell phone use in vehicles all together for safety purposes.  Thousands of people have died because they were using their cell phones or got into an accident with someone using their cell phone.  For this reason, there are heavy fines to people who are caught doing this deadly habit.  A fine may sound horrible, but it cannot compare to getting seriously injured due to lack of attention to the road.

The road is not the only place being affected by overuse of cell phones.  Classrooms also have numerous problems due to students using their cell phones in class.  Even if cell phone usage is disallowed in classrooms, there are obviously students who use their phones for texting purposes anyway.  This creates huge problems in classrooms for both students and professors.  Dr. Elaine Brown, Department Chair of the English Department, feels that cell phones do not cause many problems for her class.  “I don’t mind cell phones in the classroom, cell phones rarely ring during my classes and when it has happened, it was an oversight and the student apologized for the interruption,” says Dr. Brown.  Dr. Brown’s class syllabus does make a statement about cell phones and how they should be turned off to avoid interrupting the class.  Like all NYIT classrooms, texting is not allowed during lectures, which both Dr. Brown and students agree that it is rude.  Students are very cooperative in Dr. Brown’s class and only use their cell phones when they need to look at the time, since there is no clock in the classroom, or to look up the meaning of a word or something relevant to the class discussion.

Some professors are still fighting the addictions students have to their cell phones.  Others have sadly given up and are now reinforcing the habit to continue. Collegedegrees.com has shared that some university professors can’t prevent their students from texting underneath their desks during lectures.  A number of these professors have even allowed students to take “tech breaks,” which gives the students in-class intermissions for tweeting and texting.  The belief to this system is that students can use their cell phones or laptops and get it over with, but this is not going to make the phone addictions go away and will actually make them worse.

Cell phone addiction, however, can affect more than just your grades.  According to Collegedegrees.com, some people are so addicted to using their mobile phones that they go as far as sleep texting, which is what it sounds like.  Sleep texting involves cell phone users who shut their eyes after a text and then opening them after receiving an answer back just to do it all over again.  This leaves both cell phone addicts sleep-deprived and often unable to even remember what they texted about over the night.  An article published by The Chronicle of Higher Education reported on a study of more than 200 students at the University of Rhode Island showed that sleep texters have lost an average of 45 minutes of sleep each week because of their cell phones.  The 45 minutes sleep text caused them to lose the first third of the night, which is when sleep is the deepest.

Another danger of cell phone addiction is the attachment the students have to the phone itself.  “The World Unplugged Project” at the University of Maryland asked over 1,000 students from 10 countries to go without any form of media for 24 hours.  “I felt something very similar to a phantom limb, only it would be like phantom cell phone,” says Ryan Blondino, a student at the University of Maryland who participated.  Professor Susan Moeller, who conducted the study, said over 50 percent of students last the full 24 hours and all students said they suffered from withdrawal symptoms in some way.  Alleyne has made his point that cell phones have become this generation’s security blanket.

If you feel you are constantly looking at your phone or your computer and want to stop, go to cellphoneaddiction.org to get some information that could make it easier to stop relying on your cell phone.  If you feel you still can’t quit using your phone after attempting to get away from it, try and seek professional help to break your addiction.

 

Are you addicted to your cell phone?  Take this quiz and find out:

 

Questions to Ask…

 

1. Is cell phone usage overtaking other parts of your life? As noted above, this could be anything from poor performance in the classroom to a lack of exercise. In most cases, it is obvious when there is an addiction.

 

2. Do you feel like you have to be talking or texting at all times? This is when major problems begin to set in. You may feel as if you have to text while in school or driving your car. In this case, it is important to get professional help as soon as possible.

 

3. Has it changed your relationships for the worse? It is a shame, but cell phone addiction in teenagers often times cuts them off from friends and family. Even though you may be spending your time on your cell phone, communicating with others, face to face interaction is extremely important.

 

Information provided by cellphoneaddiction.org

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