NYIT’s Food Choices

One+of+NYIT%27s+Old+Westbury+cafeterias.+Photo+Credit%3A+Jack+Rucigay
One of NYIT's Old Westbury cafeterias. Photo Credit: Jack Rucigay

One of NYIT's Old Westbury cafeterias. Photo Credit: Jack Rucigay

One of NYIT's Old Westbury cafeterias. Photo Credit: Jack Rucigay

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NYIT’s Old Westbury campus has a few different dining halls located at Salten, Riland, Education Hall, and The SAC, all serving, relatively speaking, the same if not very similar food. Most of the food on campus is pre-made and not made to order, with a few exceptions such as omelets or sandwiches. When asking students around campus their thoughts about the food the overwhelming response, was that NYIT’s food isn’t great but it also isn’t terrible, and that the food is somewhat overpriced for what it is. This kind of response was expected, Niche.com ranked NYIT’s food at #737 of 1,071 schools with an overall score of C+, due to the low variety of and moderate value of our food. In case you were wondering, Virginia Tech ranked 1st in the nation.

National rankings such as the survey done by Niche.com need to be taken with a grain of salt; after all, NYIT is a relatively small school in comparison to Virginia Tech’s 30,000 populations, and doesn’t necessarily have the same level of funding as a result. NYIT has also been making significant pushes in recent years to try to improve the overall quality of the food on campus. In particular, one push NYIT has made in recent years has been to make its food more appealing to its international students.

Ed. Hall, Old Westbury cafeteria. Photo Credit: Jack Rucigay

Ed. Hall, Old Westbury cafeteria. Photo Credit: Jack Rucigay

NYIT’s Old Westbury campus has between 7 and 8 thousand students enrolled, and of those 7-8 thousand students, international students make up a sizable portion. It’s fair to say that NYIT has a very diverse, multicultural student base. In fact, on the official NYIT website they claim the NYIT community is made up of students from 100 different countries. That’s 100 different places with different food and cuisines native to their respective countries. How well is NYIT accommodating it’s international students different eating habits?

When asking Amanda Greaves, who works at NYIT’s Salten Cafe, about the variety of international food NYIT serves, she explains “we’re always trying to do new things, every week.” She said that NYIT’s dining services makes a lot of Asian food, stating that noodles and stir frys are “their specialty” and that they always try to do Italian food and pasta at least once a week, as well as Mexican and other Hispanic food.

Their usually is an international option available at one of the dining halls. But what exactly does NYIT’s international student base think? The opinion of NYIT’s international student base is, for the most part, not very far off from that of the general collective student base. When asked her opinion, Mojgan Masuomi, an Iranian born NYIT student, stated that “it’s nice having different kinds of food every day at the cafeteria… but (the variety of food) could be so much better.” She also posed a question of how “fresh or healthy” the food looks, or doesn’t look in this particular situation. Other countries have different rules, regulations and standards regarding their food and how fresh it is; what’s the social norm in America isn’t always what’s expected in other cultures. Additionally she stated that while she “has seen some international food being prepared here” most of the international food seems to be of the same places, namely Asian and Spanish or South American cuisine, “they could add different food to the menu to appeal more to other students.”

Food at Old Westbury cafeteria. Photo Credit: Jack Rucigay

Food at Old Westbury cafeteria. Photo Credit: Jack Rucigay

When asking around about what improvements could be made to NYIT’s dining halls to appeal better to international students, a mixed bag of responses was received. One easy improvement they could make would be to import international snacks to sell in their dining halls. A student who wished to remain unanimous mentioned NYIT has sold pocky (a Japanese snack) before, but now when they go to the dining halls looking for Japanese food “the best I can find is a cup of noodles.” More imported food from around the world would definitely be a welcomed addition by NYIT’s students. Another recommendation was that NYIT opens another dining hall serving only international food, an interesting thought given there are places on campus like De Seversky Mansion which don’t have easy access to a dining hall. Overall, the students like that there’s different food being served every day at NYIT’s dining halls, they just want to see a larger variety of it.
**Do you disagree about the current state of the food here at NYIT? Go to Campusslate.com, where you can voice your opinion in the comments section of this article, as well as read my indepth, completely honest, NYIT review food.**

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